Resources for Traveling to Philadelphia

Top Can’t Miss Exhibits in Philadelphia

May 16, 2022

Philadelphia is filled with wonderful art museums and galleries to explore, many of which have recently reopened with new health and safety measures in place. Below is a roundup of some of the exciting exhibits that are on view now or coming soon around the region.

Harry Potter: The Exhibition, Electricity, The Franklin Air Show, and 100 Years of the Walt Disney Company at The Franklin Institute

Explore Hagrid's Hut (pictured above) at The Franklin Institute. Photo courtesy of Harry Potter: The Exhibition.

Harry Potter: The Exhibition is now open at The Franklin Institute and promises to be “the most comprehensive touring exhibition ever presented about the Wizarding World.” With its World Premiere underway in Philadelphia, the experience invites wizards, witches and muggles of all ages to explore a collection of authentic film props and costumes along with plenty of spellbinding surprises. The groundbreaking exhibition spans thousands of square feet and features 10 distinct areas, including Hogwarts castle and Hagrid’s Hut. Prior to exploring these immersive environments, guests are able to choose their house and wand at the beginning of the experience — decisions which will deliver a magical, personalized journey as they encounter the characters, moments, beasts and settings from the Harry Potter, Fantastic Beasts, and expanded Wizarding World franchises. Tickets are available now.

Two of The Franklin Institute’s most popular exhibits – Electricity and The Franklin Air Show – are open once again. Electricity, the classic exhibit inspired by and dedicated to the museum’s namesake Ben Franklin, recently got an upgrade. The space invites guests to spark their curiosity while learning all about electricity and how it is created. The Franklin Air Show is also back and better than ever. Prepare to take flight while exploring this exhilarating exhibit dedicated to aviation.

Another world premiere exhibition set to open at The Franklin Institute in February 2023 will celebrate 100 Years of the Walt Disney Company. The anniversary exhibit will celebrate a century of innovation and imagination from the creative empire, while also honoring its founder Walt Disney’s legacy. Galleries and hundreds of Disney artifacts – some never seen outside of the company’s vaults – will be on display. The characters and stories that the Walt Disney Company has brought to life from 1923 to 2023 will also be incorporated into the exhibit.

Isaac Julien: Once Again (Statues Never Die) and Modigliani Up Close at the Barnes Foundation

The Barnes Foundation Detail Room 19, North Wall. Image © The Barnes Foundation Philadelphia. Photo by S. Murray.

Beginning June 19, 2022, Isaac Julien: Once Again (Statues Never Die) will be on view at the Barnes Foundation. The immersive film installation by artist and filmmaker Isaac Julien will explore the decades-long relationship between Dr. Albert C. Barnes and Alain Locke, along with the contested presence of African sculptures in western museums. Isaac Julien: Once Again (Statues Never Die) will be on view June 19 through September 4, 2022.

Opening October 16, 2022, Modigliani Up Close will give visitors a closer look at how Amedeo Modigliani created his paintings and sculptures. The exhibit will explore the iconic artist’s working methods and materials, which contributed to his unique style. Modigliani Up Close will be on view October 16, 2022 through January 29, 2023.

Sean Scully: The Shape of Ideas, Waiting for Tear Gas, Pictures in Pictures, Elegy: Lament in the 20th Century, and Matisse in the 1930s at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Made of twelve separate panels, Backs and Fronts by Sean Scully is a unique interpretation of conflict with its abrupt shifts in color, composition and scale from panel to panel. Photo by J. Ryan for PHLCVB.

Sean Scully: The Shape of Ideas – the work of Sean Scully, deemed one of the leading abstract artists of our time – highlights the artist’s unique contributions to contemporary art through his signature stripes and bold experimentation with scale and composition. The exhibition has been expanded to include additional paintings throughout several galleries, totaling more than 100 of Scully’s works, dating from the early 1970s to the present. Sean Scully: The Shape of Ideas will be on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art through July 31, 2022.

Waiting for Tear Gas will be on view through July 17, 2022 and offers visual representations of political protests. Guests will be encouraged to examine the artists’ involvement in, and responses to, moments of political protest and unrest.

Pictures in Pictures – also on view through July 17, 2022 – will give visitors the chance to examine how artists have created images that include other images.

Elegy: Lament in the 20th Century which is on view through July 24, 2022, showcases how artists have responded to tragedy, grappled with mortality, and commemorated those who have passed through their artwork. Visitors will have the chance to dwell on works of art centered around the powerful conditions and emotions that come with grief and loss. There is also a space set aside in one of the galleries that is dedicated to reflection, as this exhibition may spark a range of reactions and emotions from visitors.

In collaboration with the Musée de l’Orangerie in Paris and the Musée Matisse Nice, the Philadelphia Museum of Art will present the first major exhibition devoted to the pivotal decade of the 1930s in the art of Henri Matisse. Opening October 20, 2022, Matisse in the 1930s will present more than 100 works, ranging from both renowned and rarely seen paintings and sculptures, to drawings and prints, to illustrated books. It will also feature documentary photographs and films. Matisse in the 1930s will be on view October 20, 2022 through January 29, 2023.

Liberty: Don Troiani’s Paintings of the Revolutionary War, Black Founders: The Forten Family of Philadelphia, and The Declaration’s Journey, 1776-Today at the Museum of the American Revolution

'Liberty: Don Troiani’s Paintings of the Revolutionary War' at the Museum of the American Revolution. Photo by K. Huff for PHLCVB.

On view through September 5, 2022, Liberty: Don Troiani’s Paintings of the Revolutionary War brings together over 45 paintings by renowned historical painter — and alum of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts — Don Troiani, whose career has been dedicated to recreating scenes from the Revolutionary War by referencing sources, archaeology, artifacts and additional research. The works, which are on public display together for the first time in the Museum of the American Revolution‘s Patriots Gallery, are paired with artifacts that either inspired or are featured in Troiani’s paintings, including weapons, textiles, and more, presenting viewers with a one-of-a-kind snapshot of key moments from the war. Key works on view include the artist’s 2017 painting of the Boston Massacre, which is paired with an original copy of Paul Revere’s engraving of the event, as well as a new commission, Brave Men as Ever Fought, featuring a young African American sailor from Philadelphia observing Black and Native American troops in the Continental Army marching past Independence Hall. Now, people from all over the world can experience this special exhibition in a new 360-degree virtual tour that brings the exhibit to life. To learn more about the exhibition, click here.

Upcoming exhibits to the Museum of the American Revolution include Black Founders: The Forten Family of Philadelphia and The Declaration’s Journey, 1776-Today. Coming to the museum in February 2023, Black Founders: The Forten Family of Philadelphia will tell the story of Forten and his descendants, and how they lived during the American Revolution and cross-racial relationships in Philadelphia. Visitors will also learn how the Forten family went on to become leaders in the abolition movement leading up to the Civil War. The exhibit will be on view February 11 through November 26, 2023. Opening in the fall of 2025, The Declaration’s Journey, 1776-Today will explore how the Declaration of Independence became one of the most world-renowned statements of political rights in human history.

Extreme Deep: Mission to the Abyss and The River Feeds Back at the Academy of Natural Sciences

Extreme Deep: Mission to the Abyss will be on view through July 24, 2022. Photo by J. Ryan for PHLCVB.

On view at the Academy of Natural Sciences, Extreme Deep: Mission to the Abyss reveals the mysteries of the ocean’s greatest depths. Visitors will get the chance to explore newly discovered life forms, bubbling thermal vents, deep-sea research submersibles, and shipwrecks including the Titanic. Guests will learn about the amazing creatures that thrive in total darkness, as well as the technology that only recently has allowed scientists to travel to the ocean floor in order to discover creatures no one knew existed. Extreme Deep: Mission to the Abyss will be on view through July 24, 2022.

Opening June 1, 2022 at the Academy of Natural Sciences is The River Feeds Back – an immersive sound installation created by artists Annea Lockwood and Liz Phillips. The exhibit brings the sounds of the Schuylkill River watershed to life. The enchanting soundscape was recorded at Pennsylvania sites along 135 miles of the Schuylkill River, from its headwaters to its mouth, as well as its tributaries including Tulpehocken Creek, French Creek and Wissahickon Creek. Guests will experience this dynamic sound work through a variety of listening portals arranged throughout the Academy’s Dietrich Gallery. The River Feeds Back will be on view through October 30, 2022.

Women in Motion: 150 Years of Women’s Artistic Networks at PAFA, From the Ground up: Artists and the Built Environment, and Making American Artists: Stories from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1776–1976 at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA)

Women in Motion: 150 Years of Women’s Artistic Networks at PAFA explores the artistic networks of women artists exhibiting, studying, and teaching at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) from its founding in 1805 to the end of World War II. This exhibition will include more than 80 works of art by more than 50 women artists. Women in Motion: 150 Years of Women’s Artistic Networks at PAFA will be on view through July 24, 2022.

Also on view at PAFA through July 24, 2022 is From the Ground up: Artists and the Built Environment. This exhibition features artists interested in architecture and the built environment. Visitors are introduced to the artists’ technique, perspective and subject matter that reflect a variety of approaches to modern physical placemaking in the twentieth century.

In the fall of 2022, Making American Artists: Stories from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1776–1976 will open at PAFA. Some of the most iconic works in the museum’s collection will be presented alongside pieces by traditionally underrepresented artists. The exhibit will examine what it meant to be an American artist when the institution was founded, as well as what it meant to be an American artist by the late-twentieth century. Making American Artists: Stories from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1776–1976 will be on view October 6, 2022 through April 2, 2023.

The 19th Amendment: How Women Won the Vote at the National Constitution Center

Photo courtesy of the National Constitution Center.

2020 commemorated the centennial of the women’s suffrage movement and the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which guaranteed women the right to vote. The National Constitution Center chronicled this pivotal period in American history with the debut of a new permanent exhibit, The 19th Amendment: How Women Won the Vote, now on view. Inside the 3,000-square-foot exhibit, visitors will find nearly 100 artifacts that highlight some of the many influential women who were a prominent part of the 70-year movement, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Alice Paul, and Ida B. Wells.

The Stories We Wear at the Penn Museum

Mang Pao (Dragon Robe) Costume of an opera singer in China during the Qing Dynasty, 19th century CE (Object 29-96-160A). Photo by E. Sucar, University of Pennsylvania Communications.

The Penn Museum is showcasing 2,500 years of style from civilizations from around the globe via a 3,700-square-foot exhibition, The Stories We Wear, on view through June 12, 2022. Through a collection of approximately 250 objects including attire, jewelry, uniforms, regalia, and tattoos, the exhibition examines the role clothing and accessories play as expressions of identity in different societies, while inviting visitors to discover common themes throughout time and in different languages and cultures. The exhibition is organized into five different themes, highlighting how people dressed for ceremonies, performances, battles, work and play, and to rule, with artifacts including a 19th century opera robe from China, a samurai sword dating back to 1603, and contemporary objects such as a full Philadelphia Eagles uniform loaned by former linebacker Connor Barwin.

Centennial Innovations, and Albert M. Greenfield Makerspace at the Please Touch Museum

Centennial-Innovations. Photo courtesy of Please Touch Museum.

Two new permanent exhibits are now on view at the Please Touch Museum in West Philadelphia. Inspired by the 1876 Centennial World’s Fair in Philadelphia — for which Memorial Hall, the home of the Please Touch Museum, was constructed — Centennial Innovations engages children throughout the space, asking them “If you could change the world… What would you create? Who would you become? What would a new world look like?” Centennial Innovations features several colorful installations and multi-sensory interactives, including a stage to share ideas and the City of Philadelphia’s historic Centennial Fairgrounds Model. The Albert M. Greenfield Makerspace is intentionally found just across from Centennial Innovations and continues children’s creative journey, exploring more of how kids are creating and empowering them as inventors. The Makerspace’s design is driven by STEM principles and features adjustable height workbenches and stools, as well as resources such as hammers, screwdrivers, drills, hot glue guns, measuring tape, and other tools that will aid in the child’s vision. To plan your visit to the Please Touch Museum, click here.

Johnny Irizarry La Brega: Art for Reimagining the World and This is My Home at the National Liberty Museum

On view at the National Liberty Museum, Johnny Irizarry’s La Brega: Art for Reimagining the World explores the diasporic experience through the lens of a Puerto Rican. Through his work, Johnny Irizarry reveals the essence of la brega, loosely translated as “the struggle,” while acknowledging everyday hardships and the intent to persevere. On view through August 15, 2022.

This is My Home opens June 3, 2022 at the National Liberty Museum, allowing five artists to tell their stories, while inviting guests to recognize our shared humanity. Each immersive “home” will explore a different issue currently threatening liberty. Each artist will strive to create a space of understanding and empathy. This is My Home will be on view through October 30, 2022.

Designing Motherhood, Unseen, and Spit Spreads Death: The Influenza Pandemic of 1918-19 in Philadelphia at the Mütter Museum

Designing Motherhood at Mütter Museum. Photograph by Constance Mensh for DM and the Mütter Museum.

The Mütter Museum — dedicated to displaying fascinating discoveries about the human body with unique specimens, models and instruments — has three new exhibitions on view: Designing Motherhood, Unseen, and Spit Spreads Death: The Influenza Pandemic of 1918-19 in Philadelphia. On view in the Mütter Museum’s Cadwalader Gallery through May 2022, Designing Motherhood is the inaugural exhibition of a larger project that spans an additional exhibition (now open at Philadelphia’s Center for Architecture and Design), a book, design curriculum, oral history project and public programs, such as talks and workshops, that examine how the designs of tools, systems, techniques and customs shape and define the public perception and realities of human reproduction and birth. The exhibition analyzes designs of reproductive health, as well as the medicalization of reproduction. Objects on view include a breast pump flange, twenty-first-century silicone pessary, women’s health magazines and other items. Unseen offers rare glimpses of 85% of the Mütter Museum‘s collection that is typically locked away in storage and not accessible to the public. Images taken by forensic photographer Nikki Johnson during a behind the scenes tour of the museum’s storage spaces and back rooms are on view in Thomson Hall alongside other rarely-seen items. Lastly, Spit Spreads Death: The Influenza Pandemic of 1918-19 in Philadelphia. Philadelphia had the highest death rate of any major American city during the influenza pandemic of 1918–19. The exhibit explores how neighborhoods in Philadelphia were impacted, how the disease spread, and what could happen in future pandemics.

Rodin’s Hands at the Rodin Museum

'Two Hands,' modeled 1904 by Auguste Rodin, French, 1840–1917; cast 1925 by the founder Alexis Rudier (French, 1874–1952). Bronze, 18 x 20 7/8 x 12 3/4 inches (45.7 x 53 x 32.4 cm). Bequest of Jules E. Mastbaum, 1929. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2021.

Now on view at the Rodin Museum along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Rodin’s Hands highlights Auguste Rodin’s mastery in conveying emotion and storytelling through the sculpting of hands. The exhibition features fifteen bronzes and plasters — many of which are rare or unique to the Philadelphia collection — which join the other masterpieces on view, both inside and outside the museum, as part of one of the largest collections of the sculptor’s work outside of Paris. Rodin’s Hands will be on view through December 2023.

City of Love: Artists Inspired by Philadelphia at Neon Museum of Philadelphia

Proudly celebrating its one year anniversary, Neon Museum of Philadelphia presents City of Love: Artists Inspired by Philadelphia. The exhibit will showcase the work of 14 artists whose art is inspired and shaped by the City of Brotherly Love. Visitors will get to explore the artists’ unique perspectives of the diverse city through various mediums. Guests will view art ranging from abstract portraits of local residents to photos of the Schuylkill River taken from a kayak. City of Love: Artists Inspired by Philadelphia will be on view April 29 – June 19, 2022.

Keith Haring: A Radiant Legacy, Kyle Confehr: Process is the Product, and (re)Frame: Community Perspectives on the Michener Art Collection at Michener Art Museum

Keith Haring: A Radiant Legacy gives visitors the chance to see a private collection of more than 100 works by the acclaimed Pop Art icon. The traveling exhibition includes many of Keith Haring’s icon print series, along with two rare subway drawings. Born in Reading, Haring became fascinated by the colorful graffiti art found on city streets, which influenced his own style. Both an artist and activist, Haring created art for causes in cities around the world. Many of his works were designed for charities, hospitals, daycare centers, and orphanages. Keith Haring: A Radiant Legacy will be on view through July 31, 2022.

Philadelphia-based artist and designer Kyle Confehr blurs the lines between art and graffiti in his work. Using paint markers and aerosol cans of spray paint, Confehr creates large murals as he goes – free hand, without a set plan or outcome – therefore making his process, the product. An immersive street art experience, Kyle Confehr: Process is the Product will be on view at Michener Art Museum through October 9, 2022.

TIP: Keep an eye out for Confehr’s work throughout Philadelphia, including at the Philadelphia International Airport, the Fillmore club, and restaurants like Neighborhood Ramen and HoneyGrow.

Starting June 18, 2022, the Michener Art Museum will invite the community to help reinterpret the museum’s permanent collection through its exhibition called (re)Frame: Community Perspectives on the Michener Art Collection. Various “frames” will be spread out throughout the museum’s galleries, prompting visitors to share their own perspectives on selections from the museum’s collection. (re)Frame: Community Perspectives on the Michener Art Collection will take place June 18, 2022 through March 5, 2023.

Hearing the Brush: The Painting and Poetry of Warren and Jane Rohrer at Woodmere Art Museum

Rohrer Install © www.JackRamsdale.com Photo courtesy of Woodmere Art Museum.

Hearing the Brush: The Painting and Poetry of Warren and Jane Rohrer now on view at Woodmere Art Museum explores the creative relationship between a husband and wife who inspired each other through the use of their words and visual forms. Warren Rohrer was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and became one of Philadelphia’s leading abstract painters. Jane Rohrer grew up in Virginia and became known for her poetry’s observational and emotional qualities. Visitors to the exhibit will enjoy finding the connections between words and paint. Hearing the Brush: The Painting and Poetry of Warren and Jane Rohrer will be on view through July 10, 2022.

Don’t miss out on Woodmere’s four ongoing exhibits: La Cresta: A Land-Sculpting Installation by Syd Carpenter and Steve Donegan inspired by the horticultural practice of hügelkulture and part of a larger landscape plan on Woodmere’s grounds, Expressionism in Bronze: The Sculpture of Viorel Farcas which delves into the emotional crossover from spiritual to physical through Viorel Farcas’ figurative, expressionist creations, Sculpture and Nature also known as “Woodmere’s Outdoor Wonder” which blends art, horticulture, and environmental science, and lastly, Free Interpretation of Plant Forms Harry Bertoia’s monumental fountain sculpture that was re-installed at Woodmere in partnership with the City of Philadelphia.

Ahmed Alsoudani: Bitter Fruit, Narrative Terrain: Landscape as Storytelling, and Jayson Musson: His History of Art at The Fabric Workshop and Museum

Installation view of Ahmed Alsoudani: Bitter Fruit. The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. Photo by Carlos Avendaño.

On view through May 29, 2022 at The Fabric Workshop and Museum is Ahmed Alsoudani: Bitter Fruit. Examine the artist’s vibrant, expressionistic paintings that allude to an undercurrent of the shared experience of trauma and violence in a whole new way. Alsoudani’s works have been turned into large-scale sculptures that are both tantalizing and grotesque.

Opening on May 3, 2022 at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Narrative Terrain: Landscape as Storytelling will examine how landscape has been a source of artistic inspiration for centuries. Visitors will be challenged to expand their own understanding of how they relate to the world around them. Narrative Terrain: Landscape as Storytelling will be on view May 3 through July 3, 2022.

Jayson Musson: His History of Art opens July 22, 2022 at The Fabric Workshop and Museum and will explore the question: “In what ways can humor address inequality in the arts?” Jayson Musson, who became an internet sensation with his YouTube series ART THOUGHTZ, is known to incisively satirize both pop culture and art “insiders,” by exposing the elitism of the art world. His exhibit will investigate the ways popular art historical images impact our cultural conscienceness. Jayson Musson: His History of Art will be on view July 22 through November 13, 2022.

Pool: A Social History of Segregation at Fairmount Water Works

Pool: A Social History of Segregation investigates the role of public pools in the United States with the goal of deepening understanding of the connection between water, social justice and public health. Opening September 2021 in Philadelphia, situated in the former Kelly Pool (pictured, circa 1962) in the National Historic Landmark Fairmount Water Works. Visit poolphl.com for more information.

The historic Fairmount Water Works — once the sole water pumping station for the City of Philadelphia — reopened to the public on World Water Day, March 22, 2022, featuring a new, multi-disciplinary exhibition, Pool: A Social History of Segregation (POOL). POOL will be hosted in the former John B. Kelly swimming pool found within the historic building and will explore segregated swimming in the United States and the relationship between public pools, racial discrimination, public health, and social justice. The installations and experiences featured throughout the 4,700-square-foot exhibition will be comprised of audio and video vignettes of swimming icons, activists and scholars projected onto the surface of the pool, in addition to photographs, films and other work by Philadelphia-area artists. POOL will be on view through September 2022.

RAW Académie at ICA: Infrastructure and Na Kim FFC on 6, 7, 8 at Institute of Contemporary Art

RAW Académie at ICA: Infrastructure and Na Kim FFC on 6, 7, 8 are both currently on view at the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania. RAW Académie is based in Dakar, Senegal. The residential program is centered on research, study, and thought rooted in the question: “How do we learn from each other?” Directed by artist, curator, activist, and filmmaker Linda Goode Bryant, RAW Académie at ICA: Infrastructure will be on view through May 22, 2022. Na Kim FFC on 6, 7, 8 is part of a larger project at the museum called OUTSIDE IN, a series that will visually transform ICA’s 36th Street façade. The goal is to capture the eyes of passersby, in addition to the visitors within ICA’s ramp space gallery. Na Kim is a conceptually-driven graphic designer who is known for her use of bold colors, shapes, and patterns inspired by everyday life. Her dynamic installations and environments captivate her audiences. Na Kim FFC on 6, 7, 8 will be on view through July 10, 2022.

Derrick Adams: Sanctuary at The African American Museum in Philadelphia

The Road: Keep Your Head Down and Your Eyes Open, 2021. Courtesy Derrick Adams and Salon 94. Photo courtesy of African American Museum in Philadelphia.

Derrick Adams: Sanctuary at The African American Museum in Philadelphia (AAMP) consists of 50 works from mixed-media collages to sculpture. Through his pieces, Derrick Adams draws inspiration from The Green Book, while imagining safe destinations for the Black American traveler during the Jim Crow era in America. Guests are required to make a timed entry reservation. Derrick Adams: Sanctuary will be on view through August 28, 2022.

Becoming Weatherwise: A History of Climate Science in America at American Philosophical Society Library & Museum

The American Philosophical Society Library & Museum is located in Philadelphia's Old City. Photo by K. Huff for PHLCVB.

Becoming Weatherwise: A History of Climate Science in America at the American Philosophical Society Library & Museum explores the ways we study the weather and climate. The exhibit takes a closer look at the questions and methods that have driven weather- and climate-related research in the Western world from the mid-eighteenth century to today. Guests will also examine how ideas and views have changed over time. Studying the weather is critical to certain industries such as agriculture, as well as in the interest of human health and safety. Guests will also learn more about the role the American Philosophical Society and its members have had in the history of weather and climate study. Becoming Weatherwise: A History of Climate Science in America will be on view through December 31, 2022.

Gatecrashers: The Rise of the Self-Taught Artist in America and Fragile Earth: The Naturalist Impulse in Contemporary Art at the Brandywine River Museum of Art

Grandma Moses (Anna Mary Robertson Moses) (American, 1860–1961), Sugaring Off, 1943, oil on canvas, courtesy of Galerie St. Etienne, New York. © Grandma Moses Properties Co., New York.

Gatecrashers: The Rise of the Self-Taught Artist in America will open May 28, 2022 at the Brandywine River Museum of Art. This exhibition celebrates self-taught artists who fundamentally changed the art world after World War I. Despite not having any formal art training, these early-twentieth century painters “crashed the gates” of major museums across the United States and by doing so, they diversified the art world across lines of race, ethnicity, class, ability, and gender. Featuring more than 50 works of art, this exhibition explores the remarkable ways that self-taught artists reshaped the idea of who could be considered an “artist” in the U.S. Gatecrashers: The Rise of the Self-Taught Artist in America will be on view through September 5, 2022.

Opening September 24, 2022, Fragile Earth: The Naturalist Impulse in Contemporary Art at the Brandywine River Museum of Art will showcase the wide range of approaches that ecologically concerned artists take to bring awareness to important environmental causes, while highlighting the powerful role that artists play in advocating for the planet. Fragile Earth: The Naturalist Impulse in Contemporary Art will be on view September 24, 2022 – January 8, 2023.

The Future Will Follow the Past: An Exhibition by Jonathan Horowitz at Weitzman National Museum of American Jewish History

Weitzman National Museum of American Jewish History. Photo by Barry Halkin/Halkin Photography.

The Weitzman National Museum of American Jewish History reopens May 13, 2022 with a special exhibition called The Future Will Follow the Past: An Exhibition by Jonathan Horowitz. The exhibit will explore the transformative changes America has experienced since 2020, as well as the issues the country has been grappling with for decades, including antisemitism, racial violence, immigration, women’s rights, LGBTQ+ rights and more. The exhibit also offers new perspectives on history and raises questions related to themes, ideas, and events found in The Weitzman’s core exhibition, which interprets over 360 years of American Jewish life. The Future Will Follow the Past: An Exhibition by Jonathan Horowitz will be on view through December 2022.

Making Place Matter and Mi Herencia, Mis Raices… My Heritage, My Roots.. at The Clay Studio

Molly Hatch, Philadelphia Waterworks (detail), 65 inches (165 cm) in height, hand-thrown, hand-painted porcelain plates, underglaze, glaze, gold luster, 2021. Photo by John Polak. Courtesy of the artist and Todd Merrill Studio. Making Place Matter, The Clay Studio, www.theclaystudio.org, South Kensington, Philadelphia, PA, opening Spring 2022.

Now open in its new home in South Kensington, The Clay Studio is welcoming visitors to explore its Inaugural Exhibition Making Place Matter. The exhibit features work by Peruvian-born artist Kukuli Velarde, American-born, Massachusetts-based artist Molly Hatch, and Egyptian American artist Ibrahim Said, now based in North Carolina. Through the use of clay, each artist explores the idea of place with regard to personal history, cultural heritage, and social justice. Making Place Matter will be on view through October 2, 2022.

Also on view at The Clay Studio is Mi Herencia, Mis Raices… My Heritage, My Roots.. by artist Nitza Walesca. Visitors will get a close look at Walesca’s work, which is inspired by her indigenous Puerto Rican, Taino heritage. A South Kensington resident herself, she creates innovative vessels based on traditional forms and adorns them with Taino symbols. Mi Herencia, Mis Raices… My Heritage, My Roots.. will be on view through May 29, 2022.

The Big Graph and Prisons Today: Questions in the Age of Mass Incarceration at Eastern State Penitentiary

The Big Graph at Eastern State Penitentiary. Photo by R. Hashem.

A new column representing 2020 incarceration rates has been added to The Big Graph at Eastern State Penitentiary. The Big Graph is a 16-foot-tall, 3,500-pound plate steel sculpture illustrating three sets of statistics: the unprecedented growth in U.S. incarceration rates since 1900, the racial breakdown of the American prison population in 1970 and today, and every nation in the world charted both by rate of incarceration and by policies around capital punishment. The Big Graph is on view during all public hours. Prisons Today: Questions in the Age of Mass Incarceration is a companion exhibit to The Big Graph. Prisons Today: Questions in the Age of Mass Incarceration sheds light on the issues surrounding incarceration. With 2.2 million citizens in prison or jail, the U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world – a phenomenon driven by changes in laws, policing, and sentencing, not by changes in behavior. The exhibit also highlights how poor and disenfranchised communities (mostly communities of color) have been disproportionately impacted throughout these historic changes, which remain nearly invisible to many Americans. Prisons Today: Questions in the Age of Mass Incarceration is also open to visitors during all public tour hours.

Cover image: Liberty: Don Troiani’s Paintings of the Revolutionary War at the Museum of the American Revolution. Photo by K. Huff for PHLCVB.

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